Weather Forecast for:
Abbotsford Airport

Updated: Oct 23, 2018 at 3:34 AM

Mon
Oct 22

High: 16 ºC
 
 

Mon PM
Oct 22

 
Low: 8 ºC
Perc: 4 mm

Tue
Oct 23

High: 13 ºC
Low: 8 ºC
Perc: 6 mm

Wed
Oct 24

High: 11 ºC
Low: 8 ºC
Perc: 16 mm

Thu
Oct 25

High: 13 ºC
Low: 7 ºC
Perc: 9 mm

Fri
Oct 26

High: 14 ºC
Low: 7 ºC
Perc: 3 mm

 

True Armyworm 5. June 2018

During April and May, true armyworm moths may migrate from southern USA and Mexico on wind currents to parts of Southern Canada including B.C., Manitoba, and Ontario. True armyworm is not known to overwinter in Canada. True armyworm prefers grass crops such as cereals, pasture, grass hay and corn. However, under high populations, true armyworm larvae may also feed on broad leaf plants. Adults feed on flower nectar or other sweet sources. Young larvae will skeletonize grass foliage and eat small holes in leaves. From the third instar and older, larvae will devour entire leaves. Larvae will also sometimes feed on developing seed heads and corn tassels and ears. Once an area is sufficiently defoliated, larvae will move in a group to other grass stands to resume feeding. True armyworms can cause significant but often patchy crop damage in only a few days, and can cause rapid crop devastation when the larvae population is high. In southwest B.C., the first generation of larvae, feeding in June and July, can cause significant crop loss to grass hay and cereals. The second generation of larvae in August and September can be even more destructive, affecting both grass and corn crops. 2017 was the first year damage was recorded for this pest in B.C.

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OCTOBER Update to Manure Spreading Advisory #3 of 2018: South Coast Region

For the past two years, significant rainfall started by mid-October in the Fraser Valley, above the long term average (see Figure 1 below). Forecasts may provide some indication as to what can be expected this year, better to plan and be prepared in advance of the rainy season when manure applications are not recommended.

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Video of a cow using a mechanical brush

This video shows a cow pushing open a weighted gate to get access to a mechanical brush during an experiment conducted at the UBC Dairy Eduction and Research Centre in Agassiz, Canada. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DAAvnPFAEz0

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Cows are highly motivated to access a brush (2018)

When cows are allowed access to mechanical brushes they are cleaner and spend about five-fold more time grooming than when brushes are not available, suggesting that these brushes are important for the cow. To better estimate just how important access to an automated mechanical brush is to indoor-housed dairy cows, we conducted a study designed to test the motivation of dairy cows to access a mechanical brush.

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Manure Spreading Advisory #3 for 2018: South Coast Region

Date: September 1, 2018
  • Perennial grasses continue to benefit from fall manure applications when applied to meet crop nutrient needs.
  • Manure applications for cover crops and newly seeded grasses should be based on a soil test and only applied if the cover crop will become well established to uptake nutrients prior to the end of the growing season. Manure applications on harvested or fallow fields are not recommended.

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PFCA Summer Student 2018

August 31, 2018 - As the forage season slowly comes to an end so do high level if pests. Corn root worm females are getting ready to start reproducing and laying eggs in the soil. These eggs will overwinter and be the start of next years populations. To prevent large populations in crops the following year, rotating crops or even switching varieties can help. Monitoring this years population was done to predict what next season would be like. All traps have been removed as some fields have began to harvest. During the monitoring season things such as weather conditions and temperature was seen to impact the numbers of specimens found. It is unclear if there is a connection at all.

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AgSafe launches new COR Self-Assessment website for B.C.'s agriculture industry (May 2018)

AgSafe has launched a new free safety self-assessment web tool for B.C.’s agriculture organizations and other naturally aligned industries. 

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Grey Tortrix Moth

Grey tortrix (Cnephasia stephensiana) caterpillars caused damage to alfalfa in the Williams Lake and Kersley regions of B.C. in 2009, 2010 and 2011. Since 2011, damage by this pest has been reported in Lumby, Sparwood, Creston and Fort Fraser. Farmers are asked to report any suspect damage in new regions to the B.C. Ministry of Agriculture offices. 

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No PFCA Silage Corn Testing this year

The Pacific Field Corn Association’s Corn Hybrid Trials will not be undertaken in 2018. The Agricultural Research and Development Center in Agassiz is not willing to renew the 30-year-old co-operative framework for access to its facility and use of the necessary equipment to undertake the testing program. Since there are no other freezing, grinding and drying facilities that can be efficiently utilized by the staff, the PFCA has no other alternative but to discontinue to offer the silage corn testing program.

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Spotted Wing Drosophila Factsheet (2018)

Spotted wing drosophila (SWD) is a major insect pest of small fruit and tree fruit crops, as they lay eggs in ripe fruit. Infestation risk factors include high canopy humidity, and ripe and over-ripe fruit (hanging, dropped or rejected). Following the guidelines below will help to achieve the best possible SWD management.

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