Advisories

Manure Spreading Advisory #2 for 2017: South Coast Region

The Manure Spreading Advisory Committee (consisting of industry and government representatives) is advising careful manure application for select fields. The committee will monitor weather and soil conditions and will issue further advisories as conditions change.

Read Full Story Here

August UPDATE to Manure Spreading Advisory #1 of 2017: South Coast Region

Date: Aug 1, 2017  
Refer to Manure Spreading Advisory #1 of 2017 (April 3, 2017) for the current Advisory.  The following Update does not change the Advisory.

This update will look at an aspect of the Right Rate – one of the 4R’s of nutrient management.  To know the nutrient value of what you apply, you need to know your spreader application rates.

A reliable, quick method to calibrate your estimates is the following:

Read Full Story Here

JULY Update to Manure Spreading Advisory #1 of 2017: South Coast Region

Date: July 6, 2017

Refer to Manure Spreading Advisory #1 of 2017 (April 3, 2017) for the current Advisory. The following Update does not change the Advisory. Continue to use a minimum buffer distance of 5 meters from wet watercourses and ditches or 3 meters from dry watercourses and ditches during summer.

Last month’s update related to the loss of nitrogen (N) from manure during warm weather and continues to be relevant throughout the summer.

Read Full Story Here

JUNE Update to Manure Spreading Advisory #1 of 2017: South Coast Region

Refer to Manure Spreading Advisory #1 of 2017 (April 3, 2017) for the current Advisory. The following Update does not change the Advisory. Considerations for spreading manure during warm weather With the onset of warm weather around the South Coast of BC it is important to consider the impact of high temperatures on nitrogen (N) loss from manure. Volatilization of ammonia during and shortly after application is greatly increased when temperatures are high. Several other factors including manure composition, time to incorporation, wind, soil pH and moisture, and application method will impact ammonia loss as well. However, spreading manure when temperatures are above 25°C can result in a loss of 50% of the ammonia N within three hours of application. To avoid losing the readily available ammonia N in your manure Apply during the cooler times of day and when wind speeds are low Incorporate the manure as soon as possible Farmwest.com provides an Ammonia Loss From Manure calculator which can help predict the potential N loss during manure application. Losing ammonia from manure is a direct loss of its fertilizer value and should be considered when planning application timing and calculating manure’s contribution to crop N requirements.

Read Full Story Here

Manure Spreading Advisory #1 for 2017: South Coast Region

Effective April 3, 2017

It is acceptable to apply manure on established grasses, fields being seeded within two weeks of application, and berry fields if: ­

Read Full Story Here

March UPDATE to Manure Spreading Advisory #4 of 2016: South Coast Region

Refer to Manure Spreading Advisory #4 of 2016 (November 7, 2016) for the current Advisory: “in general, manure application on any crops is not advised.” Soils remain wet throughout the Fraser Valley. Manure application on wet or frozen ground followed by significant precipitation would present a very high risk of pollution occurring from runoff. The continued cold weather in the Fraser Valley means established grass fields will take longer than previous years to benefit from manure spreading. Watch the T-Sum, a sum of daily mean temperatures above 0°C, for your area increase at Farmwest.com. The T-Sum is one factor used to determine appropriate timing for the first manure application on grass fields. More importantly, however, decisions about the first manure application should consider the overall risks of runoff from the field, not just the state of the grasses. On some but not all fields, conditions will be suitable for manure application before T-Sum reaches 200. On other fields, conditions will not be suitable even after T-Sum reaches 200 (e.g. if fields are still saturated from rains).

Read Full Story Here

February UPDATE to Manure Spreading Advisory #4 of 2016: South Coast Region

Refer to Manure Spreading Advisory #4 of 2016 (November 7, 2016) for the current Advisory: “in general, manure application on any crops is not advised.” T-Sum values, a sum of daily mean temperatures above 0°C, for the region are listed below. With a colder than average winter, values are lower than last year and the historical average. It will likely take longer than previous years for established grass fields to benefit from manure spreading. Watch the T-Sum for your area increase at Farmwest.com. The T-Sum is one factor used to determine appropriate timing for the first manure application on grass fields. More importantly, however, decisions about the first manure application should consider the overall risks of runoff from the field, not just the state of the grasses. On some but not all fields, conditions will be suitable for manure application before T-Sum reaches 200. On other fields, conditions will not be suitable even after T-Sum reaches 200 (e.g. if fields are still saturated from rains).

Read Full Story Here

Manure Spreading Advisory #4 2016: South Coast Region

The Manure Spreading Advisory Committee (consisting of industry and government representatives) is advising against manure applications due to lower air temperatures, the increased potential of significant rain events, and lack of vegetative cover and/or reduced nutrient uptake of cover crops. The committee will monitor weather and soil conditions and will issue further advisories as conditions change. In general, manure application on any crops is not advised until further notice. See below for advice on avoiding overflowing manure pits. Producers are responsible for decisions regarding manure spreading. Legislation gives no specific dates for manure spreading, but it does not allow for manure to be spread in a manner that causes pollution. Please read the entire advisory for details and important informationt to assist producers with decision-making about manure application.

Read Full Story Here

Manure Spreading Advisory #3 for 2016: South Coast Region

Perennial grasses continue to benefit from fall manure applications when applied to meet crop nutrient needs. Manure applications for cover crops and newly seeded grasses should be based on a soil test and only applied if the cover crop will become well established to uptake nutrients prior to the end of the growing season. Manure applications on harvested or fallow fields are not recommended. Manure should not be applied within 8 meters of ditches or watercourses. Buffer width should be increased for slopes greater than 5% and/or if the potential for runoff exists. Consider wind speed and direction when applying manure and how it can have a negative impact on your neighbours. The wind can also increase ammonia loss and soil loss through erosion. Reminder that field-stored solid agricultural wastes (except vegetation waste) must be covered as of October 1. Please read the entire advisory for details and important information regarding manure applications.

Read Full Story Here

Update to Manure Spreading Advisory #2 2016: South Coast Region

Refer to Manure Spreading Advisory #2 of 2016 (April 4, 2016) for the current Advisory. The following Update does not change the Advisory. · Perennial grasses continue to benefit from fall manure applications when applied to meet crop nutrient needs. · When cropping after corn, cover crops or grassland planted after September 1 should not receive manure unless the need for nitrogen has been proven by a soil test. There is usually enough nitrogen remaining in the soil for a cover crop or newly seeded grass. · Manure applications on harvested or fallow fields are not recommended unless cover crops are planted and will become well established to uptake nutrients prior to the end of the growing season. · As the chances of wet and rainy conditions increase in September, guidelines for setbacks for manure spreading increase from 5 m (as per the current advisory) to 8 m from ditches or watercourses. · Plan manure applications to empty storage facilities before the rainy season

Read Full Story Here

Pages