Weather Forecast for:
Abbotsford Airport

Updated: Apr 21, 2018 at 7:02 PM

Sat PM
Apr 21

 
Low: 3 ºC
 

Sun
Apr 22

High: 14 ºC
Low: 4 ºC
 

Mon
Apr 23

High: 21 ºC
Low: 6 ºC
 

Tue
Apr 24

High: 22 ºC
Low: 6 ºC
 

Wed
Apr 25

High: 24 ºC
Low: 7 ºC
 

 

Soil Health Tech Bulletin I (2017)

Soil Health is on every one’s mind these days and most people are looking towards more sustainable agriculture with a reduction in the use of synthetic fertilizers and pesticides. Soil Health is a combination of biological, chemical and physical properties that combined determine the Soil Quality but more importantly of recent termed Soil Health. These two terms will continue to overlap as we look at soil, not just as a lifeless inert growing medium but more as a living, dynamic and continually changing ecological environment. Healthy soils are all about the interaction between plants and soil microorganisms that complete this cycle of life and the activities going on in the top 15 cm of soil that supports most of the life on this plant. This is less understood than the vast universe that we are a part of. Researchers today are looking at the human biome and what is happening with the microbial population in the human gut and how we function. Our research on soil health is finding that the plant rhizosphere is much like the human gut or I relate it to the gut of the plant and the interaction of the microbes in the rhizosphere is much like the relationship in the human gut. Research at A&L on soil health is taking on an ecological approach where we are studying the relationship between plant and the soil biome and the signaling that takes place here.

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Clubroot in the Peace Region (2017)

Imagine you couldn’t grow canola, warns farm leader.  Clubroot’s arrival in the Peace isn’t a shocker, but it’s another sign 
farmers are flirting with disaster, say canola experts.  If you’re growing non-resistant canola varieties, you could wake up one day to find ‘astronomical’ levels of clubroot spores, says agronomist Dan Orchard.

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With Designer Bacteria, Crops Could One Day Fertilize Themselves (2017)

For the last 100 years, ever since German chemists Fritz Haber and Carl Bosch figured out how to pluck fertilizer out of thin air with brute-force chemistry, farmers have relied on an imperfect product to make their plants grow: fertilizer. Production of the stuff burns through 3 percent of the world’s natural gas annually, releases tons of carbon into the atmosphere, and runs off into rivers and streams and aquifers. Relying on fossil fuels to grow food was never exactly sustainable.

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Magnesium - The Case for Managing Magnesium (2017)

Like sulphur, Mg is moving into the foreground

No one is taking anything away from “The Big Three.” Clearly, nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (N, P and K) have a direct and powerful influence on yield, and must be managed with great skill.

Increasingly, though, we’re learning that secondary nutrients and micronutrients are also worth paying attention to.

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Soil Compaction VIDEO - Taking Action on Soil Compaction (2017)

Swiss researcher Matthias Stettler set up his soil compaction sensors for a unique live show for farmers at the recent Compaction Action field day in Ontario. In this video Stettler talks about the impact of compaction and some of the options producers have to help counteract it. Click here.

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True Armyworm 4. Pest Alert September 7, 2017

True Armyworm second generation larvae have been observed severely damaging grass hay and forage corn in the Fraser Valley and Vancouver lsland. General locations confirmed with heavy larvae feeding and damage to grass hay on Vancouver Island include Saanich, Duncan, Chemainus, Port Alberni, Comox, Courtenay, Black Creek. Fraser Valley locations seeing damage on grass fields and forage corn: Delta, Abbotsford, Sumas, Chilliwack, Deroche. Scout your fields for larvae activity. If you can easily find larvae, the damage threshold has been reached, and management options should be considered. Significant foliage loss can occur in a few days, either in spots, edges, or throughout a whole field. Moist, lusher areas are preferred, i.e. low areas, shady, and greener areas. Larvae will move to new feeding sites en masse once an area is consumed. They can be seen on roads and in yards, searching for new feeding areas. Significant damage can happen quickly, within a few days. 


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True Armyworm 3. Confirmed in Abbotsford Grass Hay Fields August 2017

True Armyworms have been confirmed in Abbotsford grass hay fields. Growers should check hay fields for armyworms (caterpillars) not only on Vancouver Island, but also in the Fraser Valley.

For more information: Tracy Hueppelsheuser Entomologist, Plant and Animal Health Branch, British Columbia Ministry of Agriculture
Phone: 604-556-3031
Email: Tracy.Hueppelsheuser@gov.bc.ca

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Solar Eclipse August 21, 2017

You were sure to notice the drop in heat during Monday's eclipse.  A new solar radiation sensor installed by Environment and Climate Change Canada at the AAFC Agassiz Research and Development Centre picks up the drop in heat.  The graph below shows the solar radiation by the minute for August 21, 2017 in Agassiz, B.C.

 solar radiation

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Support available for ranchers impacted by British Columbia wildfires

The B.C. government is continuing to work with the Government of Canada to ensure B.C. ranchers have access to either existing or new programs as part of the overall response to the devastating wildfires in the province’s Interior. The potential impact is severe as B.C. ranchers have an estimated 30,000 animals within the boundaries of the wildfire-affected areas. The number of confirmed livestock injuries and losses is not available yet as the ongoing emergency response continues. Once the information is available, the B.C.

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Climate Data Report: "Climate Change - The Need for Adaptation"

Recommendations for Producers
Although 1 year of data is not enough to develop concrete recommendations for producers in the Vanderhoof area, if the climate patterns recored in 2016 continue there will need to be changes to cropping systms in order to remain competitive. Some operational options and future research considerations for producer are listed below:

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