Weather Forecast for:
Abbotsford Airport

Updated: Dec 10, 2018 at 7:58 AM

Mon PM
Dec 10

 
Low: 2 ºC
Perc: 14 mm

Tue
Dec 11

High: 6 ºC
Low: 2 ºC
Perc: 40 mm

Wed
Dec 12

High: 4 ºC
Low: 3 ºC
Perc: 29 mm

Thu
Dec 13

High: 5 ºC
Low: 3 ºC
Perc: 40 mm

Fri
Dec 14

High: 6 ºC
Low: 2 ºC
Perc: 15 mm

 

AgSafe launches new COR Self-Assessment website for B.C.'s agriculture industry (May 2018)

AgSafe has launched a new free safety self-assessment web tool for B.C.’s agriculture organizations and other naturally aligned industries. 

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Grey Tortrix Moth

Grey tortrix (Cnephasia stephensiana) caterpillars caused damage to alfalfa in the Williams Lake and Kersley regions of B.C. in 2009, 2010 and 2011. Since 2011, damage by this pest has been reported in Lumby, Sparwood, Creston and Fort Fraser. Farmers are asked to report any suspect damage in new regions to the B.C. Ministry of Agriculture offices. 

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No PFCA Silage Corn Testing this year

The Pacific Field Corn Association’s Corn Hybrid Trials will not be undertaken in 2018. The Agricultural Research and Development Center in Agassiz is not willing to renew the 30-year-old co-operative framework for access to its facility and use of the necessary equipment to undertake the testing program. Since there are no other freezing, grinding and drying facilities that can be efficiently utilized by the staff, the PFCA has no other alternative but to discontinue to offer the silage corn testing program.

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Spotted Wing Drosophila Factsheet (2018)

Spotted wing drosophila (SWD) is a major insect pest of small fruit and tree fruit crops, as they lay eggs in ripe fruit. Infestation risk factors include high canopy humidity, and ripe and over-ripe fruit (hanging, dropped or rejected). Following the guidelines below will help to achieve the best possible SWD management.

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Fraser Valley Pest Assessment Inventory - Pest Analysis 2017

As our climate changes, weather patterns are expected to shift, which could significantly alter growing conditions and therefore the populations of insects, weeds, pathogens and invasive species across the Fraser Valley. These changes are likely to increase the complexity and challenges associated with pest management. In 2016, an inventory was created that documented pest-related activities in the Fraser Valley, as well as perceived pest threats across 30 agricultural commodities. The pest-related activities included research, outreach, monitoring, and surveillance, and resulted in a list of over 300 projects that have been conducted in the Fraser Valley over the past five years. In addition to this information, interviews were conducted with specialists, growers and producers to establish top priority pests or pests that were believed to be an increasing threat to each commodity. The additional analysis of the Fraser Valley Pest Assessment Inventory undertaken below is intended to assist in focusing activities and research to mitigate pest-related impacts on the agricultural community in this region. This initial assessment could provide a platform for a cohesive and coordinated approach to shared pest threats, and will inform a series of fact sheets that will improve the availability of relevant management information for Fraser Valley producers.

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Corn Rootworm 2018.1 Fact Sheet

Click here for FACT SHEET PDF (with photos)

Western Corn Rootworm

  • Detected for the first time in the Fraser Valley in 2016 and reached record levels in local corn fields during the 2017 season.
  • Single most important factor contributing to economic loss and shifting management practices in corn growing regions in North America.

Damage

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Brown Marmorated Stink Bug - Samurai Wasps (2018)

BC farmers and the Ministry of Agriculture are gearing up for the first phase of an intense battle with the invasive brown marmorated stink bug this year. Acheampong says new funding will be dedicated to putting up new traps in farms, to get an idea of just how far the stink bugs have spread into farmland. The pesky and sometimes smelly pests are a major concern for farmers throughout the US and Canada. A 2010 study found the insect caused $37 million in damage to the US apple industry alone, and since then the stink bugs have moved into southern Ontario, Prince Edward Island and now British Columbia. The stink bug also attacks and damages various tree fruits, berries, grapes, vegetables, corn and a variety of ornamental plants. The first sighting of the destructive Brown Marmorated species was in Penticton in 2016, but as of November last year most of the sightings of the insect have been in or around the City of Kelowna.

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Brassicas to Extend the Grazing Season

Use of Brassica Crops to Extend the Grazing Season - Cool-season perennial grass and grass-legume pastures typically become less productive as the grazing season advances from June to November. Forage brassica crops such as turnip, swede, rape, and kale can be spring-seeded to supplement the perennial cool-season pastures in August and September or summer-seeded to extend the grazing season in November and December. Brassicas are annual crops that are highly productive and digestible and can be grazed 80 to 150 days after seeding, depending on the species (see table on back page). In addition, crude protein levels are high, varying from 15 to 25 percent in the herbage and 8 to 15 percent in the roots, depending on the level of nitrogen fertilization and weather conditions.

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Farm Size and Animal Welfare - UBC Dairy Centre Report (2017)

Concerns about farm animal welfare often revolve around the issue of farm size. Critics suggest that animals on larger farms are less likely to receive individual attention, and that the shift to larger farms results in a decline in standards of care and ultimately a lower quality of life for these animals. For those that ascribe to this view the news is bad. Farm size shows every indication of continuing to grow as the number of dairy farms declines (Fig 1). In terms of animal welfare, concerns appear to fall into three broad categories: 1) that the technologies inherent to large farms are detrimental to the animals, 2) that due to dilution of worker effort over a larger number of animals, the standard of care provided to individuals animals will decline, and 3) that some practices perceived to be beneficial, like access to the outdoors, may become impractical once farms reach a certain size. In the sections that follow we review evidence relating to all three concerns.

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2017 BC AgriStability Enhancement Program may cover pest outbreaks if they caused significant damage

The BC Government has made special provisions to help producers suffering income declines in 2017. The British Columbia AgriStability Enhancement Program allows agricultural producers to enroll late and without penalty into the existing 2017 AgriStability Program with additional benefits such as:

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